Do Tabby Cats Shed A Lot? The Answer May Surprise You


All tabby cats shed, some more than others. The term “tabby” refers to a coat pattern rather than a particular cat breed. Therefore, the rate at which a tabby cat sheds depends on its breed.

 

The tabby pattern is most common among short-haired breeds, though some long-haired cats also possess this trait. Continue reading to discover which tabby breeds shed the most and how to prevent excessive shedding.

 

Which Tabby Cats Shed The Most?

 

Long-haired tabby cats often shed more than short-haired varieties, and these breeds can be challenging to groom, thanks to the tangles and mats of their long fur. The more you groom a cat, the less it will shed.

 

Below are 20 of the most common tabby cat breeds, along with the shedding, coat length, and grooming requirements of each.

 

Breed Shedding Rate Coat Length Grooming Needs
Abyssinian Seasonal Short Easy to groom
American Bobtail Normal Short, Long Easy to groom
American Curl Normal Short, Long Easy to groom
American Shorthair Normal Short Easy to groom
Bengal Normal Short Easy to groom
Birman Occasional Long Easy to groom
Domestic Shorthair Occasional Short Easy to groom
Egyptian Mau Normal Short Easy to groom
Javanese Seasonal Short, Long Easy to groom
Maine Coon Frequent Long Requires lots of grooming
Manx Normal Short Requires lots of grooming
Norwegian Forest Cat Frequent Long Requires lots of grooming
Ocicat Seasonal Short Easy to Groom
Persian Frequent Long Requires lots of grooming
Rex Infrequent Short Easy to groom
Ragdoll Occasional Long Easy to groom
Savannah Normal Short Easy to groom
Scottish Fold Normal Short, Long Easy to groom
Siberian Seasonal Long Requires lots of grooming
Turkish Van Seasonal Long Easy to groom

 

The breed you possess is the most significant factor in how much the tabby will shed. A cat such as the American Curl has a high shedding rate, whereas the Bengal is a much lower shedder.

 

What Other Factors Affect How Much My Tabby Cat Sheds?

 

All cats shed to greater and lesser degrees, and the tabby is no exception. While certain breeds shed less overall, all cats shed more during the spring and autumn months. Multiple coat layers also trigger greater amounts of shedding.

 

In general, an indoor cat sheds less than an outdoor cat, though the shedding rate is affected by the age and gender of the cat. A healthy cat will shed more than a sick cat.

 

How Can I Moderate My Cat’s Shedding?

 

Grooming your cat is a crucial way to keep shedding under control. Additionally, keeping your cat happy and healthy can help limit shedding – cats who are feeling stressed can begin to shed in clumps. 

 

And their diet can impact their coat. Foods that contain omega 3 fatty acids can help prevent shedding, particularly grain-free varieties. Some cats require more A, B, and E vitamins to keep their coats healthy, while others need a greater amount of protein.

 

Wet foods generally have a much larger protein content than dry foods. If you notice that your cat is shedding excessively, sometimes even this small change can make a difference.

 

Plus, bathing can help moderate shedding. It’s best to keep this infrequent, though, as most cats hate water, and bathing them is likely to cause stress.

 

Why Does My Tabby Cat Shed More In The Spring And Autumn?

 

All cats shed more in the spring, and this is because of the change in temperature of the seasons. Through winter, your cat will grow a thick coat to keep it warm, but as the hotter months approach, it will begin to shed this excess fur.

 

This is an entirely normal process, so don’t worry if your cat seems to lose a lot more fur towards the end of winter.

 

Cats also shed more during the autumn as they make room for the growth of a thick layer of winter fur. The amount of daily sunlight is what triggers these changes in your cat. This is why indoor cats don’t shed as much – they are exposed to artificial light rather than sunlight.

 

How Do I Know If My Tabby Cat Is Shedding Too Much?

 

A limited amount of shedding is perfectly normal for all cats, but how much shedding is too much shedding?

 

If you notice a change in the amount your cat usually sheds (outside of seasonal changes), it may be worth consulting a vet. And the same applies if you start to notice any bald patches or sore spots.

 

Otherwise, your furry friend is just engaging in perfectly normal behavior for their species that helps them regulate their temperature and maintain good overall health through the changing seasons.

 

What Is The Best Way To Limit Shedding?

 

The best way to prevent excessive shedding from your cat is to brush their coat regularly. This allows you to remove any long hairs before they fall off and attach themselves to the furnishings of your house.

 

Are Tabby Cats Hypoallergenic?

 

No, a tabby cat is not hypoallergenic. Possessing the traits of a tabby does not determine the amounts of Fed d 1 in the cat’s fur, urine, and saliva.

 

Final Thoughts.

 

The tabby is a unique breed of cat thanks to its distinctive ‘M’ marking and a range of color patterns. As ‘tabby’ does not refer to a breed but rather a pattern, it’s impossible to say how much a ‘tabby’ sheds without knowing its breed.

 

All cats shed to bigger or lesser degrees, and the amount of shedding from your tabby depends on its breed, age, and gender.

 

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Michael Grover

About Me I have been a pet owner for most of my life. I am now retired and spend my days writing about problems relating to cats, dogs, and funeral poems. I am passionate to stop animal cruelty in any shape or form. My passion is to help people like you identify behavior problems in cats and dogs. That is what I do. Over the years of my life, I have always kept cats and dogs. About 4 years ago I retired and found I had a lot of time on hands so I started to write all about dog and cat problems. It was suggested to me that I should start up a website and publish my words to help people with their pet problems. I am still writing every day and hope you find my articles useful. Regards Mike Grover

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